As a result of the worsening situation in Syria, there are currently over 33,000 registered refugees from the country, and the majority of these refugees are having difficulties accessing a proper education.

 

Over 50 percent of the refugee population in Syria are under the age of 18. When asked what they wish they could have access to the most, a majority of them say an education, and parents are also worried about their children’s lack of schooling. There are school systems existing in some refugee camps, but it isn’t a successful learning environment. The schools are underfunded, which usually means half-day classes. Class sizes are often huge in these camps, with up to 70 students in each primary school classroom, and with a limited amount of resources and knowledge, many are not receiving a substantial education.

 

(Peter Biro/IRC)

(Peter Biro/IRC)

Syria used to be a very well-educated nation, but with the civil war overtaking the country, many are finding it difficult even getting any amount of schooling. Many Syrian children have never even attended school.

 

Ensuring an adequate education for the people of Syria would be an important response to the occurring crisis. Chances of recovery for the country would be greatly favored as a result, and it would help to prevent some of the factors contributing to mass migration and extremism. Save The Children recently estimated that, as a result of Syrian children not attending school, 5.4 percent of the country’s future GDP will be spent on recovery costs.

 

There needs to be recognition that education in a safe environment is the key to a successful recovery for Syria and its people. Awareness of practical educational difficulties is increasing, with the access of education, building of temporary classrooms, and making sure there are available teachers being addressed. However, quality of education is being ignored. The understanding that an accurate education for Syrian refugees will make a lasting difference needs to make more of an appearance.

 

What do you think about Syrian education and what do you think we can we do to help it? Tweet me @julimiller97 with your thoughts