Dr. Jill Stein, who is running in the presidential race for the Green Party nomination, has proven to share many beliefs with Democratic candidate, Bernie Sanders. Stein strives to get big money out of politics and is for the halt of weapons being sent to the Middle East. She also proposed a “Green New Deal” which would produce around 20 million living wage jobs for Americans nationwide. Despite Stein’s and Sanders’ mutual bid for presidency, Stein has openly stated that she is open to the idea of a potential collaboration with Sanders.

 

The Green Party candidate has criticised the Democratic party previously, specifically focusing these comments on the nomination process. In an interview with Grist Magazine, she said, “The [Democratic] party does this fake go-left thing by allowing genuine reformers to be seen and heard, but they never allow them to go all the way,’’ she said. “You can’t really have a revolutionary campaign inside a counter-revolutionary party.’’ She also has displayed strong opinions suggesting that Sanders should have formed an Independent presidential run or run on the Green Party ticket.

 

Despite her obvious allegations against the Democratic party, Stein believes, and has previously stated, that Sanders shares a vision similar to her own, which is motivating her to consider standing with the Vermont senator in his fight to win the Democratic nomination against Hillary Clinton. She states to NBC News: “Many of my supporters are also his supporters. I’m asked all the time if there could be a Bernie Sanders collaboration and my answer to that has always been yes. The Green Party has long sought to establish a collaboration with Bernie Sanders.” However, she has not received a response from Sanders.

 

In 2012, Stein also ran as a third-party candidate. She was successful in achieving 450,000 votes, making her the most successful female candidate in a general election. Dr. Stein has been surprisingly strong with her political foothold, even in 2002 when she ran against Mitt Romney, and managed to garner 3 percent of the votes. However, Stein would never attempt to leave the Green Party to try and change the Democratic party from within, and Sanders would most likely never consider an independent or third party run.

 

 

In theory, combining Stein with her progressive policy positions with the new momentum of Sanders would be an overall successful collaboration. However, the likelihood of Sanders somehow collaborating with Stein if he didn’t win the nomination is very low.

 

What would you think of a Sanders/Stein team in the White House? Let’s talk here or find me on Twitter @julimiller97