Aerie Real (www.fashionweare.com)

Aerie Real (www.fashionweare.com)

Perfectly flat stomach, no crow’s feet, frown lines, or cellulite; this is the picture of beauty in our society today — a picture of perfection. Most people would agree that advertising companies take Photoshop too far and set unrealistic beauty standards for women. The models plastered on every magazine and billboard have flawless bodies that show no signs of imperfections.

 

Although most people are aware that these images are Photoshopped to perfection, they still have an undoubtedly large impact on the way women view their bodies and the standard of beauty they feel they must live up to.

 

Aerie Real (www.thegrengroupinc.com)

Aerie Real (www.thegrengroupinc.com)

This is why Aerie Real is getting so much attention. Aerie, the American Eagle lingerie line, has launched a new marketing campaign featuring unretouched models. The models featured have tattoos, beauty marks, and belly bulges, representing what the “average” 15 to 21-year-old Aerie demographic really looks like.

 

On ABC’s Good Morning America, Jenny Altman, Aerie’s Stylist and Fit expert, expressed the campaign’s goal of showing real women with real flaws and imperfections to encourage young women to embrace their own flaws and imperfections (watch the full interview here).

 

 

 

Aerie Real (www.adweek.com)

Aerie Real (www.adweek.com)

Hoping to redefine the way society views beauty, Aerie’s Real campaign is definitely a step in the right direction; however, are they depicting what the average woman really looks like? The models in the advertisements may not be Photoshopped, but they still look nearly flawless. If Aerie really wanted to make a statement about the idealistic beauty standards in the fashion industry, they could have placed non-models in their advertisements. To many, the Aerie campaign was disappointing and could lead to young women asking themselves, “If these women are this flawless without Photoshop, then what am I doing wrong?”

 

Maybe this is just the start of a trend that will continue until we do see a greater change in societal beauty standards. Hopefully, Aerie is the start of a “beauty revolution” where women and men will see beauty in bodies of all shapes and sizes. A gradual process to recognize natural beauty and curves should be embraced rather than covered up and shamed.

 

What do you think of the new Aerie campaign? Let me know by commenting below or tweeting at me @whatsthesich.