Diabetes is on the rise, and it isn’t just an American problem. Over the last 35 years, the number of people who suffer from Diabetes has quadrupled. In 1980, there were 108 million cases in comparison to the skyrocketing 422 million in 2014. This means that 1 in 11 people have Diabetes.

 

Income is one of the many factors taken into consideration for the report. China and Japan which are both low- to middle-income countries had a higher increases in the disease, 101 million in 2014. This is because treatment options are not readily available, unlike countries like the United States, which reported 62 million cases in 2014. India and Indonesia had a total of 96 million cases in 2014.

 

The report that WHO completed did not distinguish between type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but they were able to show that type 2 diabetes in adults was within the range of 85 percent to 95 percent of the cases.

The report that WHO completed did not distinguish between type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but they were able to show that type 2 diabetes in adults was within the range of 85 percent to 95 percent of the cases.

A World Health Organization (WHO) analysis, “Global report on Diabetes,” says:

  • – The number of people living with Diabetes and its prevalence are growing in all regions of the world.
  • – The epidemic of Diabetes has major health and socioeconomic impacts, especially in developing countries.
  • – In 2014, more than 1 in 3 adults aged over 18 years were overweight and more than 1 in 10 were obese.

 

On the topic, Professor Majid Ezzati says:

Rates of diabetes are rising quickly in China, India, and many other low and middle income countries, and if current trends continue, the probability of meeting the 2025 UN global target is virtually non-existent.

“Obesity is the most important risk factor for type 2 diabetes and our attempts to control rising rates of obesity have so far not proved successful. Identifying people who are at high risk of diabetes should be a particular priority since the onset can be prevented or delayed through lifestyle changes, diet or medication.”

There are two types of diabetes known to date. Type 1 Diabetes is when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin for your body, and there isn’t a cure. Type 2 Diabetes is brought on by obesity and other lifestyle choices. The report that WHO completed did not distinguish between type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but they were able to show that type 2 diabetes in adults was within the range of 85 percent to 95 percent of the cases.

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In 2012, Diabetes was responsible for the deaths of 1.5 million. Then, for 2.2 million the following year. Diabetes isn’t slowing down. The WHO is encouraging people to change their lifestyles, pay more attention to the way we eat, exercise, and live. They are recommending at least 150 minutes a week of moderate physical activity in a week.

 

How do you improve your quality of life while struggling with Diabetes? Let’s talk here, or find me on Instagram @become_bright_within