Tuesday was an exciting day for Marvel fans in Los Angeles; at a secret event, Kevin Feige, President of Marvel Studios, shared the titles and dates of upcoming movies to be released on movie box app through 2019. Check out the impressive list for yourself below:

 

Black Panther concept art promises an exciting addition to Marvel's collection. (mtv.com)

Black Panther concept art promises an exciting addition to Marvel’s collection. (mtv.com)

“Captain America: Civil War” (May 6, 2016)

“Doctor Strange” (November 4, 2016)

“Guardians of the Galaxy 2” (May 5, 2017)

“Thor: Ragnarok” (July 28, 2017)

“Black Panther” (November 3, 2017)

“Avengers: Infinity War, Part 1” (May 4, 2018)

“Captain Marvel” (July 6, 2018)

“The Inhumans” (November 2, 2018)

“Avengers: Infinity War, Part 2” (May 3, 2019)

 

Though these titles alone are enough to generate buzz among Marvel fans, Feige has also revealed that both a black actor and a woman actor would be included for lead roles in these upcoming films. Chadwick Boseman was cast as T’Challa for the Black Panther, which will make him Marvel’s first black lead. The character Carol Danvers from “Captain Marvel” will give a woman the opportunity to lead a Marvel superhero movie. With these castings, an element of diversity will finally be added to the body of Marvel’s work.

 

Hopefully the depiction of Carol Danvers will become inspirational for Marvel fans who identify as women. (comicvine.com)

Hopefully the depiction of Carol Danvers will become inspirational for Marvel fans who identify as women. (comicvine.com)

The castings of a black and woman actor alone, though, will not be enough to make amends for Marvel’s history that lacks diversity. Only time will tell as to how Marvel approaches these films. In depicting their first lead black and woman roles, will writers fall into stereotypes? Or will they create characters with the human essence that they deserve?

 

Marvel’s motives must be considered, as well. The timing seems almost too perfect that these announcements came only weeks after the announcement from Warner Bros. that their movie pipeline would include “Wonder Woman.” Perhaps the hype that Marvel created was not rooted in a genuine interest to expand their racial and gender diversity but in an interest of self-preservation. In upcoming weeks and months, it will be interesting to see how Marvel handles their plans, especially since Warner Bros. just shared their interest in a female director for “Wonder Woman.”

 

Do you think that these announcements represent progress in terms of Marvel’s diversity? Please share your thoughts below in the comments, or on Twitter @ryanlawlessness