It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s Warner Bros. building upon the successes of “Arrow” and “The Flash.” Along with executive producer Greg Berlanti, the WB has begun to colonize space on CBS for their superhero universe with the upcoming “Supergirl.”

 

Melissa Benoist side by side a drawing of Supergirl revealing her insignia underneath her disguise.

Melissa Benoist is to star in Warner Bros.’ “Supergirl.” (pmcvariety.files.wordpress.com)

Starring Melissa Benoist — a transplant to the DC universe from “Glee,” much like “The Flash” star Grant Gustin — “Supergirl” revolves around the adventures of Kara-Zor El, the cousin of Superman from his home planet Krypton. A relatively familiar story to comic fans: Kara works for a major media outlet as a mild-mannered assistant, trying to come to terms with her place in the world; only here, her cousin Superman has existed as an established hero for decades. A six minute preview for the show recently released. Almost immediately, the preview went viral. Check it out below.

 

Why should we be so excited about “Supergirl”? For starters, the pilot leaked online earlier this week, and has already been met with plenty of positive reactions online. The same thing happened for “The Flash” prior to its release, so many have speculated that the producers leaked the pilot intentionally to generate interest.

 

Secondly, it appears that the show will remain faithful to the source material. With the existence and exploits of Superman fully acknowledged in this show, we will not see Kara as a surrogate Clark Kent; she will be her own character with her own allies, enemies, and adventures.

 

 

Those who have seen “Supergirl” described it as a show oriented towards female audiences; one viewer tweeted that the show is very much based on the idea of “look how much we made this exclusively for women.” Should we really see that as a negative? “Arrow” gave us dark and brooding, “The Flash” gave us lighthearted and geeky, but both revolve around men. Let’s see heroism from a woman’s perspective.

 

While The CW’s DC shows have done a good job of levelling the gender playing fields for their characters — see: The Canary, Nyssa Al Ghul, etc.– comic book properties still lean heavily towards a male dominated audience. The action in the trailer looks phenomenal, but it’s Kara’s daily life that will specifically draw in the female audiences. Her “Devil Wears Prada” inspired boss gives an impassioned speech as to why it’s alright to call her “girl,” and they make an overt point not to sexualize her costume.

 

Characters from "Arrow," "The Flash," and "Supergirl" standing together.

The possibility of a three-world crossover is an exciting prospect for comic book fans. (moviepilot.com)

Finally, and perhaps most excitingly, despite existing on different networks, the possibility for a triple-crossover with “Arrow,” “The Flash,” and “Supergirl” is not necessarily off the table. While likely a long way down the line, Greg Berlanti spoke about the possibility, saying that “in success, all things are possible.” Also, since “Supergirl” takes place years after Superman’s arrival, they may need some time-travel help from the “Legends of Tomorrow.”

 

Only time will tell if “Supergirl” proves successful for CBS. Female fronted comic book properties have historically struggled to gain audiences — see: “Birds of Prey”, “Wonder Woman” (2011), and even “Agent Carter” — but with proper care, “Supergirl” could draw in a mostly untapped pool of viewers.

 

Will you be tuning in to watch “Supergirl”? Share with us what you’re excited to see in a comment below or find me on Twitter @connerws.