How would you respond if you were asked to perform a task “like a girl” would? Do you think your natural reaction would be altered? Exploring this very topic, Sundance Film Festival award-winning filmmaker Lauren Greenfield documented gender stereotypes for P&G brand “Always.” The video campaign/social experiment titled “#LikeAGirl” follows subjects reactions to commands. The results are nothing less than astonishing to watch.

 

 

Our writers at MUIPR wanted to know just what “#LikeAGirl” was all about. Other viewers must have felt this sentiment, too. The three-minute video has already amassed an astounding audience of over 25 million viewers. After watching the short film, it is not difficult to understand why the campaign is gaining traction.

 

 

Greenfield asks young girls and other subjects to complete various tasks such as “run like a girl,” “throw like a girl,” and “fight like a girl.”  When young adult men women respond, audiences witness weak, feeble actions, which further perpetuates the idea of gendered sexuality. It is only when the youngest girls are asked to perform that any action is pursued with conviction.

 

 

 

 

Why must the older girls act poorly and then catch themselves? The video implies that the  self-confidence of girls are compromised right around puberty. Therefore, we must look no further than to our own society for the answers we seek.

 

 

Young, pre-adolescent age girls and their parents were shocked by the campaign video and it has even spurred businesses to start focusing on a re-branding strategy. The campaign indeed helped to position Always as a thought leader in the marketplace.

 

 

Although the #LikeAGirl campaign highlights inherent weakness in our society, more importantly, it gets consumers to think about the brand.  It is only a matter of time before business school professors across the country begin highlighting this campaign strategy in their classrooms.

 

 

What do you think of the Always “#LikeAGirl” campaign? Do you think it is successfully strategic in making consumers think? Will it help them sell more products? Share your thoughts in the comments or tweet me @Kelseymbro