When world famous yogi Rachel Brathen isn’t globetrotting and sharing her love of yoga with her 1.2 million Instagram followers, she is busy at home in Aruba cultivating her online presence and growing her personal brand. In just a few years, Brathen has built a significant social following by sharing her yoga journey on Instagram and Facebook, and now Snapchat for a more candid look at her day to day life.

 

Rachel Brathen (@yoga_girl) reached out to her followers for help. (instagram.com/yoga_girl)

Rachel Brathen (@yoga_girl) reached out to her followers for help. (instagram.com/yoga_girl)

Since re-launching her newly designed website at the beginning of the year, Brathen has struggled to keep her site live – too many visitors were trying to access it at once, causing it to crash repeatedly. In fact, AT&T saw the spike in traffic and blocked the website altogether for a period of time.

 

Brathen took to social media and confided in her followers about the ongoing discussions she’s had with various host servers, including HostMonster, SiteGround, and Blue Host. Once she did this, it became a communal problem that everyone needed to work together with Brathen to solve.

 

By encouraging her fans to visit the site, Brathen accomplished the task of showing her host servers the magnitude of her social influence and following.  Additionally, the transparency of the issue was appreciated by everyone because it allowed them to feel included in the situation.

 

Attaining fame in the social age is a lot different from the traditional ways in which stars were historically born. Social media influencers are aware that gaining notoriety in the social space requires that they continue to stay relevant; indeed, their appeal lies in keeping the window from your screen to theirs open and clutter-free for direct communication to occur.

 

In order to get what she needed for her business, Brathen empowered her followers by working with them publicly, instead of letting the struggle with her website become a PR crisis.

 

Do you think the new PR practice of open dialogue with followers is more effective than traditional communications, or do you think this exhibits an image of immaturity in business? Let’s talk strategy here, or find me on Twitter @TiffaniJPurdy