As it turns out, rap music is to blame for racism at the University of Oklahoma.

 

On Wednesday morning, MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” hosts Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough reported that rap music, like those from rappers Waka Flocka Flame and Jay Z, as well as TV shows like “Empire,” are to blame for the barrage of racist chants from Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s “True Gentlemen” at the University of Oklahoma.

 

Brzezinski: There’s this rapper, Waka Flocka Flame, who has performed for these kids in the past on the campus, and he cancelled his show at the University of Oklahoma after this video surfaced, saying that in the wake of this video, he is disgusted and disappointed.

Scarborough: And you saw him on another network last night?

Brzezinski: I saw him on another network.

Scarborough: I am shocked and deeply saddened that they used that word.

Brzezinski: And then they said, “Waka Flocka Flame, thank you very much. Good luck to you.” And I am, like, I look at his lyrics. I am thinking, ‘why wouldn’t they ask this guy why you would do on that campus, and if you look at every single song – I guess you call it — that he has written.

Scarborough: It’s “n- this.”

Brzezinski: It is a bunch of garbage.

Scarborough: It’s “n- that.”

Brzezinski: It is a bunch of garbage.

Scarborough: “Kill this.”

Brzezinski: Full of n-words.

Scarborough: It’s “kill that.”

Brzezinski: Full of f-bombs. It’s wrong, and he shouldn’t be disgusted with them; he should be disgusted with himself.

 

Morning Joe guest & Weekly Standard Editor Bill Kristol blames pop culture for SAE Frat racist chant video ()

Morning Joe guest & Weekly Standard Editor Bill Kristol blames pop culture for SAE’s racist chant video (@shaunking/twitter)

“Morning Joe” guest and Weekly Standard Editor, Bill Kristol, also chimed in, saying the “cesspool of popular culture” is to blame for the racist chant sung by SAE fraternity brothers, which — let’s not forget — went exactly like this: “There will never be a n–r SAE [clap, clap]; There will never be a n–r SAE [clap, clap]; There will never be a n–r SAE [clap, clap]; you can hang them from a tree, but it will never start with me, there will never be a n–r SAE.”

 

 

Right away, social media users challenged Brzezinski and Scarborough’s coverage of SAE’s racist chants by creating a variety of memes with the hashtag #RapAlbumsThatCausedSlavery on Twitter.

 

 

Morning Joe Hosts Blasted On Twitter With Hahstag #RapAlbumsThatCausedSlavery     Morning Joe Hosts Blasted On Twitter With Hahstag #RapAlbumsThatCausedSlavery-two

 

 

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Morning Joe Hosts Blasted On Twitter With Hahstag #RapAlbumsThatCausedSlavery-ten       Morning Joe Hosts Blasted On Twitter With Hahstag #RapAlbumsThatCausedSlavery-three

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Morning Joe Hosts Blasted On Twitter With Hahstag #RapAlbumsThatCausedSlavery-five    Morning Joe Hosts Blasted On Twitter With Hahstag #RapAlbumsThatCausedSlavery-six

 

 

 

 

Later that day, as social and mobile users blasted the “Morning Joe” hosts on Twitter, Brzezinski took to Ari Melber’s  MSNBC show “The Cycle,” to attempt damage control for correlating rap lyrics to racism.

 

 

 

 

Although Brzezinski stopped short of offering the public an apology, it’s not clear the extent to which her efforts on Melber’s show could mitigate against the PR nightmare that she, Scarborough, and Krstol have created. Only time will tell.

 

What are your thoughts on “Morning Joe” hosts and their response to the racist chants perpetrated by SAE? How about Twitter users and their creation of #RapAlbumsThatCausedSlavery? Will the hashtag cause more harm than good?  Sound off in the comments section below or tweet us @muipr.