The FIFA World Cup Tournament is nearing, and people are getting ready to travel and enjoy the soccer (or football, depending on your location!) season. The world will be watching as 32 teams from across the globe play in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. As soccer season heats up, strike season heats up as well.

 

Bus workers, teachers, police, security guards, and dozens of other workers unions have either stopped working or threaten to stop if they do not receive a raise in pay. Thousands of Brazilians are using the leverage and publicity of the World Cup to make their demands heard. The workers on strike have already caused much disruption in the city of Rio. Bus strikes essentially left the city paralyzed for a couple of days, making it difficult for people to get to work and school.

 

One of the most disconcerting strike threats has been made by the workers of the LAN-TAM Airlines, a major airline for the Latin America continent. If there is a pilot strike, it would cause a major disruption for those planning to travel for the Cup.

 

The strikes leave Brazil in an awkward position as they try and prepare for the amount of people expected to be in the city for the Cup.  Brazil is worried that the bad publicity will cause people to cancel their trips and give the city and government of Rio a bad reputation.


Some believe that the strikers will get the raises they are asking for in order for the Brazilian government to avoid complications and bad publicity during the Cup. The question remains of what will happen to the workers and the economy after the Cup? There has been debate over whether or not the Cup will significantly impact the economy in a positive way. With over $11 billion spent to prepare for the Cup thus far, many wonder if the influx of tourists will bring about enough revenue to boost the economy.

 

With the World Cup starting in less than a month, the Brazilian government may be forced to act, or else it could mean disaster and embarrassment.

 

How do you think the Brazilian government will handle the strikes? Let me know in the comments below or tweet at me @whatsthesich