On Friday, May 23, four men and two women were killed by Elliot Rodger, who later shot himself. The tragic shooting near the University of California, Santa Barbara has caused a huge Internet reaction.

 

Students mourn at UCSB candlelit vigil (www.CNN.com)

Students mourn at UCSB candlelit vigil (www.CNN.com)

Prior to the crime, Rodger posted a chilling video on YouTube threatening to punish all the girls who never showed any interest in him. “You girls have never been attracted to me,” he said. “I don’t know why you girls aren’t attracted to me. But I will punish you all for it. It is an injustice, a crime.”

 

 

The release of this information sparked outrage, and the creation of the #YesAllWomen hashtag. Since the crime occurred, #YesAllWomen has remained one of the top trending topics on Twitter.

 

The idea behind the hashtag is to spread awareness about misogyny in our society. “The campaign’s point is that while not all men are guilty of crimes to women, all women are affected by misogyny,” reports ABC News.

 

Candlelit Vigil on Friday May, 24 (www.CNN.com

Candlelit Vigil on Friday May, 24 (www.CNN.com

Misogyny is not as apparent, as in society today, there is little out-stated hatred towards women; however,  it is rather subtly embedded into society and it faces little opposition. Many women have experienced belittling comments from men, and more often than not are taught that these experiences are normal.

 

The #YesAllWomen conversation is helping to spread awareness about an issue than remains a huge factor in the lives of almost half the U.S. population.

 

We have not quite come to the point where we are discussing how to fix the problem; however, with #YesAllWomen, we are rather beginning to acknowledge that there is a problem. Admitting that a problem exists is a necessary first step.

 

The #YesAllWomen campaign is not a solution to this social dilemma, but it has started a conversation that has not been discussed before. The people posting about this topic on Twitter are not just politicians or professors, but normal people as well. All of whom are sharing their personal experiences to raise awareness about a very important social issue.

 

(www.Twitter.com)

(www.Twitter.com)

(www.Twitter.com)

(www.Twitter.com)

(www.Twitter.com)

(www.Twitter.com)

(www.Twitter.com)

(www.Twitter.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What do you think about the #YesAllWomen conversation? What do you believe are the best next steps in obliterating misogyny in our society? Let us know in the comments below or tweet me @LydiaYekalam